Parks

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bandhavGarh national Park

Overview

Bandhavgarh was established in 1968 as a National Park, and is spread over an area of 1150 sq. kms. This national park was declared as a tiger reserve under Project Tiger in the year 1993. It is predominantly covered with vegetation like SAL, SALI, DHOBIN and has vast stretches of grasslands spread over 32 hills, the region though smaller than other wildlife parks has one of the highest density of tigers in the world. Bandhavgarh was earlier the hunting reserve of the Maharajas of Rewa, the region was a major hunting ground of animals where Maharaja Raman Singh himself shot a stupendous figure of 111 tigers by 1914. Bandhavgarh also became world renowned for its population of rare white tigers.

The historical links of Bandhavgarh are to be found in India’s worshipped mythological heroes Rama and Laxmana. The name “bandhav-garh” translates to “the brother’s fort” and believed to be gifted by Hindu God Rama to his devoted ‘bandhav’ (brother) Laxmana on his return from victory over Lanka (Ceylon). Inside the park there are 12 natural waterholes, several other historical monuments and remains of ancient caves that exhibit a 2000 year old rich historical past.

The vegetation is chiefly of Sal forest in the valleys and on the lower slopes, gradually changing to mixed deciduous forest on the hills and in the hotter drier areas of the park in the south and west. The wide valleys along the streams carry long linear grasslands flanked by Sal forests. Rich mixed forests consisting of Sal (shorea rubusta), Saja, Salai, and Dhobin etc. with dense bamboo thickets occur in many places. These together provide Bandhavgarh its rich biodiversity.

With the tiger at the apex of the food chain, it contains 37 species of mammals, more than 250 species of birds, about 70 species of butterflies, a number of reptiles.

Information

Size

437 Sq. Km

Forest Type

Mix Decidious Forest with prominent Bamboo & Sal Vegetation

Mammal Focus

Tiger, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Jungle Cat

Star Birds

Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Black Naped Monarch, Common Rosefinch, Brown Fish Owl